sue's current work

Before setting up the Breakthrough Funding brand which she sold to EY in a multi-million pound deal in March 2020, Sue began as a graphic artist and illustrator in London. She attended the University of Creative Arts from 1980 to 1984 alongside Tracey Emin and Karen Millen. Lecturers included David Hockney, Ian Dury and Zandra Rhodes and Quentin Crisp was famously a male model for life classes. 

She spent three decades working in London advertising agencies and some of the world’s biggest international companies as a renowned designer, illustrator and brand specialist. Sue is highly influenced by the work of Peter Blake, the typographer Neville Brody and the album cover designs of Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell. She retired from the corporate world after her sale to EY to continue her social impact work and concentrate on developing highly collectible limited editions for private investors. 

At last, Sue now has the time to return to her artistic roots and classical graphic design training. The energetic and witty style used to such successful effect to create her own Breakthrough Funding brand, employs a range of techniques from drawing, collage, painting and digital illustration. As ever, her work pays homage to the 'Old Masters' alongside everyday objects, pop art and music legends.

THE RETOLD MASTERS COLLECTION

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THE CRYPTOCAKES COLLECTION

Highly collectible, rare, limited edition, digital artworks for private investors, created by Sue Nelson. Inspired by the dot paintings of English artist Damien Hirst. The originals are 420mm x 594mm and each comprise 589million pixels. This is a one-time digital art creation project with only 20 originals in the cryptocake series. No more originals will be added to this series. Each has a limited edition of no more than 150. At a distance they appear to be dots or oblongs, but close up these rare works celebrate our century's old obsession with flour and sugar.